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Cameo Parkway sessions - Philly Pop Music

Cameo Parkway sessions - Philly Pop Music

  • Order:
  • Duration: 1:12
  • Updated: 04 Apr 2015
  • views: 404
videos
Joe Tarsia and Dave Appell talk about sessions with Joe Sgro at Cameo-Parkway Records. A Philly Pop Music - George Manney film. Help release the film with a Tax Deductible Donation. Just Click the Donate button on our website. http://www.PhillyPopMusic.com Narration by Michael Tearson. Cameo-Parkway Records was the parent company of Cameo Records and Parkway Records, which were major American Philadelphia-based record labels from 1956 (for Cameo) and 1958 (for Parkway) to 1967. Today the Cameo-Parkway catalogue is owned by ABKCO Records. David Appell (March 24, 1922November 18, 2014) was an American musician, musical arranger and record producer born in Philadelphia. Philadelphia-based recording engineer Joe Tarsia's skills can be heard on a significant number of classic pop music tracks, earning him over 150 gold and platinum record awards. He was also the founder and owner of the legendary Sigma Sound Studios. Around 1961, he took an audio engineering position with Cameo Parkway Records. Cameo Parkway's artists included Chubby Checker, Frankie Avalon, Fabian, Bobby Rydell, The Orlons, Dee Dee Sharp, The Dovells and Bunny Sigler.
https://wn.com/Cameo_Parkway_Sessions_Philly_Pop_Music
Cameo Parkway  Dave Appell celebration 2014 - The architects of the Philly Sound

Cameo Parkway Dave Appell celebration 2014 - The architects of the Philly Sound

  • Order:
  • Duration: 1:02
  • Updated: 23 Mar 2014
  • views: 748
videos
Dave Appell celebration with: Jerry Ross, Billy Jackson, Charlie Gracie, Joe Tarsia, Bobby Rydell, Jerry Blavat and Kal Mann's wife Mar. 2014. A George Manney film. http://www.PhillyPopMusic.com The first hit artist on the Cameo label was Charlie Gracie, the singing guitarist who hit Number One nationally with "Butterfly." Appell and his band backed Gracie on that million-seller in 1957, and on the singer's subsequent hits, "Fabulous" and "Ninety-Nine Ways" and "Wanderin' Eyes. Rydel known for "Wild One" and "Volare", also appeared in the movie Bye Bye Birdie in 1963. Dave appeared prominently in the 1956 Alan Freed film Don't Knock the Rock, and worked for a while as the studio band and music director on the Ernie Kovacs TV and radio shows in Philadelphia. Next Appell and the Applejacks were playing in Las Vegas, but they soon began to pine for their hometown and returned to Philadelphia, where they started working for Cameo Records, a label founded by Kal Mann and Bernie Lowe. Jerry Ross, songwriter and producer had an amazing run of hits with Bobby Hebb, Keith, Spanky & Our Gang, Jay & The Techniques, Dee Dee Warwick and Jerry Butler. Billy Jackson was the long-time producer and manager for The Tymes. Joe Tarsia, owner-operator of Sigma Sound Studios first worked at Cameo-Parkway as head engineer.
https://wn.com/Cameo_Parkway_Dave_Appell_Celebration_2014_The_Architects_Of_The_Philly_Sound
Chubby Checker - Hooka Tooka  (Rare Stereo version  1963)

Chubby Checker - Hooka Tooka (Rare Stereo version 1963)

  • Order:
  • Duration: 2:14
  • Updated: 22 Jun 2014
  • views: 35003
videos
'True Stereo' version from rare 'BOW' album. Recorded October 1963 at Cameo Parkway Studio, Philadelphia and published as a double A-sided single (Loddy Lo/Hooka Tooka). Hooka Tooka Writer: Ernest Evans (alias Chubby Checker) Hooka Tooka my soda cracker Does your momma chaw tobacca If ya momma chaw tobacca,say Hooka Tooka my soda cracker Hooka Tooka my soda cracker Does your momma chaw tobacca If ya momma chaw tobacca,say Hooka Tooka my soda cracker Who your love, Who your love I say You know I love my mother-in-law If your love momma like you say Why can't momma chaw Everybody yup Hooka Tooka my soda cracker Does your momma chaw tobacca If ya momma chaw tobacca,say Hooka Tooka my soda cracker Momma loves momma loves you all And you know I'm her son-in-law If you love me like you say you do Chaw tobacca too Hey are Hooka Tooka my soda cracker Does your momma chaw tobacca If ya momma chaw tobacca,say Hooka Tooka my soda cracker Hooka Tooka my soda cracker Hooka Tooka my soda cracker
https://wn.com/Chubby_Checker_Hooka_Tooka_(Rare_Stereo_Version_1963)
Dee Dee Sharp - "Rockin' Robin" - 1963 - Cameo-Parkway Records

Dee Dee Sharp - "Rockin' Robin" - 1963 - Cameo-Parkway Records

  • Order:
  • Duration: 2:27
  • Updated: 20 Nov 2013
  • views: 663
videos
https://wn.com/Dee_Dee_Sharp_Rockin'_Robin_1963_Cameo_Parkway_Records
NAV, Metro Boomin - Call Me

NAV, Metro Boomin - Call Me

  • Order:
  • Duration: 3:41
  • Updated: 18 Aug 2017
  • views: 23142075
videos
Call Me (Official Video) Song available on the Perfect Timing Mixtape https://navmetroboomin.lnk.to/PerfectTimingYD Directed by RJ Sanchez Produced by Matt Zolly For Snow-Beach Music video by NAV & Metro Boomin performing Call Me. © 2017 Boominati Worldwide/XO Records/Republic Records, a division of UMG Recordings, Inc. http://vevo.ly/l8xBt2
https://wn.com/Nav,_Metro_Boomin_Call_Me
Jo Ann Campbell - Mr. Fix-It-Man (c.1962).

Jo Ann Campbell - Mr. Fix-It-Man (c.1962).

  • Order:
  • Duration: 2:25
  • Updated: 27 Mar 2015
  • views: 555
videos
(Written by Kal Mann - Dave Appell)...Recorded 24 October & 1 November1962 Reco-Art Sound Recording,PA & Cameo Parkway Studio.PA - Orchestra Conducted by Roy Straigis Born in Jacksonville,FL 20 July 1938 Campbell began attending music school at the age of four, and won many honors as a drum majorette at Fletcher High School. In 1954 she travelled Europe as a dancer, then moved to New York, where she joined the Johnny Conrad Dancers and made several television appearances on shows such as The Milton Berle Show and The Colgate Comedy Hour. In 1956, Campbell decided to quit dancing and become a singer. She received her first recording contract with RKO-Point Records in New York and released her debut single "Where Ever You Go" / "I'm Coming Home Late Tonight" with them in 1956. It was unsuccessful and she then signed a recording contract with Eldorado Records after performing at Harlem's Apollo Theater. She wrote and released her second single, "Come On Baby" in 1957. Later that year she released "Wait A Minute", and appeared at the Brooklyn Paramount and on Dick Clark's American Bandstand show. Campbell appeared in two films: Go, Johnny, Go (1959) and Hey, Let's Twist (1962), while continuing to release records. In June 1961 she reached No. 41 in the UK Singles Chart with "Motorcycle Michael".[1] She had her biggest hit in August 1962 with "I'm The Girl From Wolverton Mountain", an answer record to Claude King's "Wolverton Mountain". Some pressings showed the title as "(I'm The Girl On) Wolverton Mountain". The song reached No. 38 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart. In April 1963, she followed up with "Mother, Please! (I'd Rather Do It Myself)", a take-off on an Anacin television commercial of the day, but this reached No. 88. After marrying Atlantic Records record producer Troy Seals in 1964, Campbell left the music industry.
https://wn.com/Jo_Ann_Campbell_Mr._Fix_It_Man_(C.1962).
DEEP - COLOR DREAMS.wmv

DEEP - COLOR DREAMS.wmv

  • Order:
  • Duration: 2:34
  • Updated: 23 Mar 2012
  • views: 723
videos
THE DEEP - 'Color Dreams' (Cameo-Parkway P 7051) November 1966 I'm still on my Rusty Evans trip at the moment and have been diggin' this 1966 album by The Deep who were a studio based group comprising Rusty and Mark Barkan. Just check out the cover art with that hallucinatory figure armed with a guitar, the psychedelic font used for the album title is a trip with it's garish pink, off-set by the sky blue song-titles on a jet black background. Even if you had never heard of The Deep in '66, the sleeve alone would have been enough persuasion for the acid munching youth to pick it from the rack to get some of that Deep action. 'Color Dreams' is an obvious highlight from this long-player but I can't help but feel that it's a Kim Fowley 'Trip' rip-off. But I don't care about that. Rusty's deep gruff vocals again hit the mark just like they did on the Ry Cooper 45 (reviewed last time out). This is psychedelic rapping over fuzz guitars.... "Blue black purple mac Orange yellow funny fellow White brown pink town Orange red pink bed We'll pretend yellow man Jesus saves planet rays Green red Commie dead Blue green yellow scream Spanish fly golden eye Pearly white outta sight..." http://expo67-cavestones.blogspot.co.uk/2012/03/deep-color-dreams.html
https://wn.com/Deep_Color_Dreams.Wmv
MFSB ~ TSOP (The Sound Of Philadelphia) 1973 Disco Purrfection Version

MFSB ~ TSOP (The Sound Of Philadelphia) 1973 Disco Purrfection Version

  • Order:
  • Duration: 9:51
  • Updated: 17 Dec 2015
  • views: 352284
videos
Philadelphia's Sigma Sound Studios got its start in 1968 when ex-Cameo-Parkway recording engineer Joseph Tarsia opened for business. He had been working with a large group of studio musicians from his old label and they moved over to his new enterprise. Those musicians were responsible for the full orchestral funk of Cliff Noble's "Love Is All Right", so much so that when it was released as a single the instrumental version that was the B side became the surprise hit and galloped all the way to #2 on the pop charts. Another song they worked on, "Keem-O-Sabe" was a sitar laced funk tune was released by Electric Indian that made it all the way to #16 in September of 1969. Assuming the name of The Assembled Multitude, they recorded the 1970 #16 pop hit "Overture from Tommy (A Rock Opera). Shortly after that, they heard that Don Cornelius, host of a local program called "Soul Train", was looking for a new original song to replace King Curtis song "Hot Potatoes" he had been using as the show's theme. When the show was getting ready to go national, he was unable to reach an agreement with the heirs of Curtis to secure the rights. Cornelius ran in to Kenny Gamble and he mentioned his quest for a new theme. Gamble organized the recording sessions and they put together about half a dozen candidates for the new theme, but one really stood out, "The Sound Of Philadelphia" which got shortened to "TSOP". Some lyrics were written and the Three Degrees were brought in to add their sweetly funky harmonies. On the original single release, their voices did not come in until the very end of the song and the words "Soul Train" were not even used. However these vocals were brought forward in a new remix meant to feature their voices one the song began to hit. The group decided on the acronym name of MFSB, which was supposed to mean Mothers, Fathers, Sisters, Brothers, but rumour has it that it actually stood for "Mother F*cking Sons of B*tches". In any case, they created a stone cold disco smash that enhanced the popularity of "Soul Train" which in turn pushed the single to #1 on the pop and R&B charts.
https://wn.com/Mfsb_~_Tsop_(The_Sound_Of_Philadelphia)_1973_Disco_Purrfection_Version
Chubby Checker - The Twist

Chubby Checker - The Twist

  • Order:
  • Duration: 2:40
  • Updated: 10 Mar 2012
  • views: 1545
videos
Chubby Checker was the unrivaled king of the rock & roll dance craze; although most of the dances his records promoted -- the Pony, "the Fly," and the Hucklebuck, to cite just three -- have long since faded into obscurity, his most famous hit, "The Twist," remains the yardstick against which all subsequent dancefloor phenomena are measured. Born Ernest Evans on October 3, 1941, in Philadelphia, he worked in a local poultry shop while in high school, and while on the job often entertained customers by singing and cracking jokes. His workplace antics helped win an audition with the local Cameo-Parkway label, who signed the fledgling singer in 1959; at the suggestion of no less than Dick Clark's wife, the portly youth was re-christened Chubby Checker, the name a sly reference to Fats Domino. Checker's first single, "The Class," showcased his skills as an impressionist; while the record became a minor novelty hit, none of its immediate follow-ups were successful. In 1960, however, he recorded "The Twist," a cover of a 1958 Hank Ballard & the Midnighters B-side; Checker's rendition de-emphasized the original's overtly sexual overtones, focusing instead on the song's happy-go-lucky charms. The single rocketed to number one during the autumn of 1960, remaining on the charts for four months; some time after it dropped off, it slowly returned to prominence, and in late 1961 it hit number one again; the only record ever to enjoy two stays at the top more than a year apart. After "The Twist" first made Checker a superstar, he returned to the top in 1961 with "Do the Pony"; that same year, he also reached the Top Ten with "Let's Twist Again," which assured the dance's passage from novelty to institution. In addition to 1961's "The Fly," Checker's other Top Ten hits included three 1962 smashes: "Slow Twistin'," "Limbo Rock," and "Popeye the Hitchhiker." He even starred in a pair of feature films, Twist Around the Clock and Don't Knock the Twist. In total, Checker notched 32 chart hits before the bubble burst in 1966; as interest in dance novelties dwindled, he briefly turned to folk music, and became a regular on the nightclub circuit. From the 1970s onward, he was a staple of oldies revival tours; in 1982, more than a decade after his last studio LP, he signed with MCA and issued the disco-inspired The Change Has Come, scoring a pair of minor hits with the singles "Running" and "Harder Than Diamond." In 1988, Checker returned to the Top 40 for the first time in a quarter century when he appeared on the Fat Boys' rap rendition of "The Twist," and he continued touring regularly throughout the decade to follow. ~ Jason Ankeny, All Music Guide PLEASE NOTE: I divided my uploads among multiple channels, Bookmark this link in your browser for instant access to an index with links to all of John1948's oldies classics. LINK: http://john1948.wikifoundry.com/page/John1948%27s+Youtube+Index
https://wn.com/Chubby_Checker_The_Twist
Chubby Checker - The Twist (Rare 'Mono-to-Stereo' Mix - 1960)

Chubby Checker - The Twist (Rare 'Mono-to-Stereo' Mix - 1960)

  • Order:
  • Duration: 2:37
  • Updated: 26 Mar 2016
  • views: 4170
videos
Recorded at Cameo Parkway Studio, Philadelphia USA and published June 1960 as a Single on the Parkway Label (The Twist/Toot). Originally recorded 1959 by the writer Hank Ballard, but Chubby Checker's cover version is more powerful and became a worldwide hit. Musicians: Chubby Checker (vocal) and among others: Buddy Savitt (sax), Ellis Tollin (drums) and The Dreamlovers (backing vocals). The Twist Writer: Hank Ballard Producers: Dave Appell & Kal Mann Lyrics: Come on baby, Let's do the twist Come on baby, Let's do the twist Take me by my little hand And go like this Ee-yah twist Baby, baby twist Ooh yeah, just like this Come on little miss and do the twist My daddy is sleepin', And mama ain't around Yeah, daddy just sleepin', And mama ain't around We're gonna twisty twisty twisty Till we tear the house down Come on and twist Yeah, baby twist Oooh yeah, just like this Come on miss and do the twist Ee-yah ('Round and 'round and 'round and 'round) ('Round and 'round and 'round and 'round) Yeah, you should see my little sis You should see my my litlle Sis She really knows how to rock She knows how to twist Come on and twist Yeah, baby twist Oooh yeah, just like this Come on little miss and do the twist ('Round and 'round and 'round and 'round) ('Round and 'round and 'round and 'round) Yeah, rock on now Yeah, twist on down Twist ('Round and 'round and 'round)
https://wn.com/Chubby_Checker_The_Twist_(Rare_'Mono_To_Stereo'_Mix_1960)
Chubby Checker - Loddy Lo.wmv

Chubby Checker - Loddy Lo.wmv

  • Order:
  • Duration: 2:16
  • Updated: 29 Jul 2012
  • views: 3310
videos
Chubby Checker singing "Loddy Lo" from November 1963 @ The Cameo Parkway Studio Sessions. Reached #12 on the Billboard Pop Charts. This is the original version, not the re-records that you have been listening to on other YouTube Channels. I do not own the coypright to this song [I can't own anything since I have been deceased since 41 AD]. This song is uploaded for informational and educational purposes only. UncleCaligula
https://wn.com/Chubby_Checker_Loddy_Lo.Wmv
Ed McMahon - Georgy Girl

Ed McMahon - Georgy Girl

  • Order:
  • Duration: 2:16
  • Updated: 06 Jun 2017
  • views: 148
videos
Ed McMahon singing Georgy Girl. The song originally appeared on Side-2 of a 1963 LP called 'And Me ... I'm Ed McMahon', released by the Cameo Parkway Records Label. It was written by Jim Dale and Tom Springfield.
https://wn.com/Ed_Mcmahon_Georgy_Girl
Jo Ann Campbell - Patches (c.1962).

Jo Ann Campbell - Patches (c.1962).

  • Order:
  • Duration: 2:57
  • Updated: 28 Mar 2015
  • views: 632
videos
(Written by Larry Kolbern - Barry Mann)...Recorded 24/25 October 1963 Reco-Art Sound Recording,PA & Cameo Parkway Studio,PA. - (UNISSUED - Released 2013) Born in Jacksonville,FL 20 July 1938 Campbell began attending music school at the age of four, and won many honors as a drum majorette at Fletcher High School. In 1954 she travelled Europe as a dancer, then moved to New York, where she joined the Johnny Conrad Dancers and made several television appearances on shows such as The Milton Berle Show and The Colgate Comedy Hour. In 1956, Campbell decided to quit dancing and become a singer. She received her first recording contract with RKO-Point Records in New York and released her debut single "Where Ever You Go" / "I'm Coming Home Late Tonight" with them in 1956. It was unsuccessful and she then signed a recording contract with Eldorado Records after performing at Harlem's Apollo Theater. She wrote and released her second single, "Come On Baby" in 1957. Later that year she released "Wait A Minute", and appeared at the Brooklyn Paramount and on Dick Clark's American Bandstand show. Campbell appeared in two films: Go, Johnny, Go (1959) and Hey, Let's Twist (1962), while continuing to release records. In June 1961 she reached No. 41 in the UK Singles Chart with "Motorcycle Michael".[1] She had her biggest hit in August 1962 with "I'm The Girl From Wolverton Mountain", an answer record to Claude King's "Wolverton Mountain". Some pressings showed the title as "(I'm The Girl On) Wolverton Mountain". The song reached No. 38 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart. In April 1963, she followed up with "Mother, Please! (I'd Rather Do It Myself)", a take-off on an Anacin television commercial of the day, but this reached No. 88. After marrying Atlantic Records record producer Troy Seals in 1964, Campbell left the music industry.
https://wn.com/Jo_Ann_Campbell_Patches_(C.1962).
Larry Gold - the Philly Sound

Larry Gold - the Philly Sound

  • Order:
  • Duration: 1:46
  • Updated: 22 Aug 2006
  • views: 11565
videos
Larry talks about Don Renaldo, Philly's premier contractor of young string and brass talent. At that time, he was enlisting musicians for the Cameo-Parkway label. Producer, composer, arranger, studio owner, player of Philadelphia's black music revolution, stretching from roots in '60s soul to today's neo-soul, Larry Gold: a white, Jewish, Curtis Institute prodigy from Frankford. Gold was the cellist for seminal Philadelphia '60s rock acts Woody's Truck Stop and Good News (featuring Michael Bacon of the Bacon Bros.). He also played in MFSB's string section. Video copyright 2005-06 George Manney From the film in production: "Philly Pop Music" http://www.phillypopmusic.com
https://wn.com/Larry_Gold_The_Philly_Sound
Ride with Norman Reedus Indian Ink Tattoo Studio edit

Ride with Norman Reedus Indian Ink Tattoo Studio edit

  • Order:
  • Duration: 4:01
  • Updated: 18 Jul 2016
  • views: 6404
videos
Video edit of Episode 3 Season 1 showing when they stopped by https://www.facebook.com/Indian-Ink-Tattoo-Studio .
https://wn.com/Ride_With_Norman_Reedus_Indian_Ink_Tattoo_Studio_Edit
Jo Ann Campbell - Waitin' For Love (c.1963).

Jo Ann Campbell - Waitin' For Love (c.1963).

  • Order:
  • Duration: 2:35
  • Updated: 28 Mar 2015
  • views: 381
videos
(Written by Cordle - Leon)...Recorded 14 February 1963 Cameo Parkway Studio,PA . Born in Jacksonville,FL 20 July 1938 Campbell began attending music school at the age of four, and won many honors as a drum majorette at Fletcher High School. In 1954 she travelled Europe as a dancer, then moved to New York, where she joined the Johnny Conrad Dancers and made several television appearances on shows such as The Milton Berle Show and The Colgate Comedy Hour. In 1956, Campbell decided to quit dancing and become a singer. She received her first recording contract with RKO-Point Records in New York and released her debut single "Where Ever You Go" / "I'm Coming Home Late Tonight" with them in 1956. It was unsuccessful and she then signed a recording contract with Eldorado Records after performing at Harlem's Apollo Theater. She wrote and released her second single, "Come On Baby" in 1957. Later that year she released "Wait A Minute", and appeared at the Brooklyn Paramount and on Dick Clark's American Bandstand show. Campbell appeared in two films: Go, Johnny, Go (1959) and Hey, Let's Twist (1962), while continuing to release records. In June 1961 she reached No. 41 in the UK Singles Chart with "Motorcycle Michael".[1] She had her biggest hit in August 1962 with "I'm The Girl From Wolverton Mountain", an answer record to Claude King's "Wolverton Mountain". Some pressings showed the title as "(I'm The Girl On) Wolverton Mountain". The song reached No. 38 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart. In April 1963, she followed up with "Mother, Please! (I'd Rather Do It Myself)", a take-off on an Anacin television commercial of the day, but this reached No. 88. After marrying Atlantic Records record producer Troy Seals in 1964, Campbell left the music industry.
https://wn.com/Jo_Ann_Campbell_Waitin'_For_Love_(C.1963).
Buddy Savitt with Cameo-Parkway session musicians - Smashed Potatoes

Buddy Savitt with Cameo-Parkway session musicians - Smashed Potatoes

  • Order:
  • Duration: 2:11
  • Updated: 30 May 2010
  • views: 984
videos
Instrumental track of Dee Dee's classic
https://wn.com/Buddy_Savitt_With_Cameo_Parkway_Session_Musicians_Smashed_Potatoes
Jo Ann Campbell - Ain't It Funny What A Fool Will Do (c.1962).

Jo Ann Campbell - Ain't It Funny What A Fool Will Do (c.1962).

  • Order:
  • Duration: 2:22
  • Updated: 28 Mar 2015
  • views: 446
videos
(Written by Johnny Mathis - George Jones)...Recorded 24/25 October 1963 Reco-Art Sound Recording,PA & Cameo Parkway Studio,PA. - (UNISSUED - Released 2013) Born in Jacksonville,FL 20 July 1938 Campbell began attending music school at the age of four, and won many honors as a drum majorette at Fletcher High School. In 1954 she travelled Europe as a dancer, then moved to New York, where she joined the Johnny Conrad Dancers and made several television appearances on shows such as The Milton Berle Show and The Colgate Comedy Hour. In 1956, Campbell decided to quit dancing and become a singer. She received her first recording contract with RKO-Point Records in New York and released her debut single "Where Ever You Go" / "I'm Coming Home Late Tonight" with them in 1956. It was unsuccessful and she then signed a recording contract with Eldorado Records after performing at Harlem's Apollo Theater. She wrote and released her second single, "Come On Baby" in 1957. Later that year she released "Wait A Minute", and appeared at the Brooklyn Paramount and on Dick Clark's American Bandstand show. Campbell appeared in two films: Go, Johnny, Go (1959) and Hey, Let's Twist (1962), while continuing to release records. In June 1961 she reached No. 41 in the UK Singles Chart with "Motorcycle Michael".[1] She had her biggest hit in August 1962 with "I'm The Girl From Wolverton Mountain", an answer record to Claude King's "Wolverton Mountain". Some pressings showed the title as "(I'm The Girl On) Wolverton Mountain". The song reached No. 38 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart. In April 1963, she followed up with "Mother, Please! (I'd Rather Do It Myself)", a take-off on an Anacin television commercial of the day, but this reached No. 88. After marrying Atlantic Records record producer Troy Seals in 1964, Campbell left the music industry.
https://wn.com/Jo_Ann_Campbell_Ain't_It_Funny_What_A_Fool_Will_Do_(C.1962).
Dee Dee Sharp - Do The Bird

Dee Dee Sharp - Do The Bird

  • Order:
  • Duration: 2:15
  • Updated: 25 Feb 2015
  • views: 6082
videos
The 5 Dutones recorded "The Bird", on Columbia Records, and Dee Dee Sharp followed with her own version of "Do The Bird" on Cameo (two different songs). This was another great "dance" record which followed in the wake of "The Twist", "Mashed Potatoes" and "The Pony" - all from the Cameo Parkway label. The "king" of the twist - Chubby Checker - recorded "Slow Twistin'" - which was the very first recording for Dee Dee - as a duet with the vibrant young songstress. This was the launching pad for Dee Dee's own long string of hits. Remember - Dee Dee is asking you to "do" "The Bird" - but please don't "flip" the bird! Recorded January/Februrary 1963 at the Cameo-Parkway Studio in Philadelphia, PA. Produced by Dave Appell and Kal Mann. Arranged by Dave Appell. Charted Pop #10, R&B #8.
https://wn.com/Dee_Dee_Sharp_Do_The_Bird
Jo Ann Campbell - Mother,Please!  (1963).

Jo Ann Campbell - Mother,Please! (1963).

  • Order:
  • Duration: 2:28
  • Updated: 28 Mar 2015
  • views: 1487
videos
(Written by Kal Mann - Dave Appell)...Recorded 14 February 1963 Cameo Parkway Studio,PA (CHARTED 1963 #88) Born in Jacksonville,FL 20 July 1938 Campbell began attending music school at the age of four, and won many honors as a drum majorette at Fletcher High School. In 1954 she travelled Europe as a dancer, then moved to New York, where she joined the Johnny Conrad Dancers and made several television appearances on shows such as The Milton Berle Show and The Colgate Comedy Hour. In 1956, Campbell decided to quit dancing and become a singer. She received her first recording contract with RKO-Point Records in New York and released her debut single "Where Ever You Go" / "I'm Coming Home Late Tonight" with them in 1956. It was unsuccessful and she then signed a recording contract with Eldorado Records after performing at Harlem's Apollo Theater. She wrote and released her second single, "Come On Baby" in 1957. Later that year she released "Wait A Minute", and appeared at the Brooklyn Paramount and on Dick Clark's American Bandstand show. Campbell appeared in two films: Go, Johnny, Go (1959) and Hey, Let's Twist (1962), while continuing to release records. In June 1961 she reached No. 41 in the UK Singles Chart with "Motorcycle Michael".[1] She had her biggest hit in August 1962 with "I'm The Girl From Wolverton Mountain", an answer record to Claude King's "Wolverton Mountain". Some pressings showed the title as "(I'm The Girl On) Wolverton Mountain". The song reached No. 38 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart. In April 1963, she followed up with "Mother, Please! (I'd Rather Do It Myself)", a take-off on an Anacin television commercial of the day, but this reached No. 88. After marrying Atlantic Records record producer Troy Seals in 1964, Campbell left the music industry.
https://wn.com/Jo_Ann_Campbell_Mother,Please_(1963).
The Six Mile Chase - Never in a Month of Sundays

The Six Mile Chase - Never in a Month of Sundays

  • Order:
  • Duration: 2:27
  • Updated: 11 Aug 2013
  • views: 816
videos
This obscure 45 was released on the Dot label and seems to be the only record by this group. The arranger was Joe Renzetti, a studio guitarist for the Cameo-Parkway label. Renzetti would go on to become an Academy Award-winning film composer for his work on "The Buddy Holly Story." This record didn't chart but was rescued from obscurity when it was put on the sixth volume of the "'60s Psych Pop Treasures" download series. Do yourself a favor and download the whole series. You'll be happier. Honest.
https://wn.com/The_Six_Mile_Chase_Never_In_A_Month_Of_Sundays
The Tymes -- Here She Comes [1964]....HD.

The Tymes -- Here She Comes [1964]....HD.

  • Order:
  • Duration: 2:44
  • Updated: 09 Feb 2015
  • views: 2132
videos
Philadelphia's Tymes were one of the sweetest vocal groups to ever step into a recording studio. Led by the warm, expressive tenor of George Williams, whose voice and phrasing were heavily influenced by Johnny Mathis, and blessed with a producer at Cameo Parkway Records, Billy Jackson, who knew exactly how to record them, the Tymes hit right out of the box with their debut single, the sparse and elegant ballad "So Much in Love" in 1963. Written by Williams, the song was given a simple, floating arrangement by Jackson that was driven by what would become the group's trademark finger snaps and featuring smooth as-honey vocals by Williams and fellow group members Al "Ceasar" Barry, George Hilliard, Norman Burnett, and Donald Banks. The Tymes followed this classic with a version of "Wonderful! Wonderful!" (the song that launched Mathis' own career in 1957) that was every bit as strong as "So Much in Love," and completed the hat trick with a third impressive single, "Somewhere." Everything the Tymes recorded with Jackson at Cameo Parkway had this same high quality, and the future looked more than bright, but the group's run on the pop charts pretty much ended with the advent of Beatlemania in 1964, which signalled a sea change in the recording industry. For some reason Cameo Parkway never released the Tymes catalog until 2005, and this collection marks the debut of the Tymes in the digital age, some 40 years after these classic ballads were recorded. Gorgeously arranged and sung, the tracks compiled here have an elegant, timeless quality that works in part because of their simple sparseness, which allows the Tymes plenty of breathing room to do what they do best, which is sing like the angels sing. "So Much in Love," "Wonderful! Wonderful!," and "Somewhere" are all here, along with other gems like "Here She Comes" (one of the few instances where the Tymes go upbeat) and the sublime "The Lamp Is Low." Better late than never, this is essential listening for fans of the vocal group genre. Review by Steve Leggett
https://wn.com/The_Tymes_Here_She_Comes_1964_....Hd.
Jo Ann Campbell -  Let Me Do It My Way (c.1962).

Jo Ann Campbell - Let Me Do It My Way (c.1962).

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  • Duration: 2:12
  • Updated: 27 Mar 2015
  • views: 149
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(Written by Battlaglia - Dixon)...Recorded 24 October & 1 November1962 Reco-Art Sound Recording,PA & Cameo Parkway Studio.PA - Orchestra Conducted by Roy Straigis Born in Jacksonville,FL 20 July 1938 Campbell began attending music school at the age of four, and won many honors as a drum majorette at Fletcher High School. In 1954 she travelled Europe as a dancer, then moved to New York, where she joined the Johnny Conrad Dancers and made several television appearances on shows such as The Milton Berle Show and The Colgate Comedy Hour. In 1956, Campbell decided to quit dancing and become a singer. She received her first recording contract with RKO-Point Records in New York and released her debut single "Where Ever You Go" / "I'm Coming Home Late Tonight" with them in 1956. It was unsuccessful and she then signed a recording contract with Eldorado Records after performing at Harlem's Apollo Theater. She wrote and released her second single, "Come On Baby" in 1957. Later that year she released "Wait A Minute", and appeared at the Brooklyn Paramount and on Dick Clark's American Bandstand show. Campbell appeared in two films: Go, Johnny, Go (1959) and Hey, Let's Twist (1962), while continuing to release records. In June 1961 she reached No. 41 in the UK Singles Chart with "Motorcycle Michael".[1] She had her biggest hit in August 1962 with "I'm The Girl From Wolverton Mountain", an answer record to Claude King's "Wolverton Mountain". Some pressings showed the title as "(I'm The Girl On) Wolverton Mountain". The song reached No. 38 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart. In April 1963, she followed up with "Mother, Please! (I'd Rather Do It Myself)", a take-off on an Anacin television commercial of the day, but this reached No. 88. After marrying Atlantic Records record producer Troy Seals in 1964, Campbell left the music industry.
https://wn.com/Jo_Ann_Campbell_Let_Me_Do_It_My_Way_(C.1962).
Evie Sands // It's This I Am

Evie Sands // It's This I Am

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  • Duration: 4:11
  • Updated: 17 May 2012
  • views: 9697
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The Brooklyn-born Sands had been in the music industry for nearly a decade before her bad luck lifted for this 1970 LP. She broke in the early '60s with a pair of forgettable singles before having the good fortune to sign with Leiber & Stoller's Blue Cat label. Unfortunately, her original recording of "Take Me for a Little While" was spirited off to Chicago where it was quickly covered by Jackie Ross. Ross had the hit. Sands' follow-up "I Can't Let Go," much loved by Brill Building and girl-group aficionados met a similar, though less cloak-and-dagger fate, with her version covered more successfully by the Hollies. Her next potential hit, "Angel of the Morning," was lost amid the bankruptcy of Cameo-Parkway, and the now familiar version by Merilee Rush became a top-10 hit. Fans can find Sands' version of "Angel of the Morning" can be found on the superb Cameo-Parkway box set. In 1969 Sands signed with A&M and was finally in a position to cash in on her deep soul voice and longstanding partnership with songwriter Chip Taylor (who'd penned both "I Can't Let Go" and "Angel of the Morning"). Their initial collaboration was the superb power-soul ballad "Any Way That You Want Me," with Sands beseeching vocal backed by a dynamic arrangement of acoustic guitars, chugging drums, strings and a deft piano figure lifted from the bass riff of "You've Lost That Lovin' Feeling." Though the single only climbed to #53, it was enough to anchor this 1970 LP of pop and soul, with seven songs by Taylor, an original by Sands and a terrific cover of Buffy Sainte-Marie's "Until It's Time For You to Go." Sands' voice is often compared to Dusty Springfield's, as on the tour de force slow-burn remake of "Take Me for a Little While" heard here. But on the Memphis soul "Close Your Eyes, Cross Your Finger," Sands finds an original vocal tone that marries southern gospel with an urban soul sound. That same urban vocal sound, reminiscent of Marilyn McCoo at times, is even more prominent on the ballad "I'll Never Be Along Again." As memorable as was Sands' upbeat soul belting, she was equally convincing on emotional ballads like "Shadow of the Evening" and "Until It's Time for You to Go." The latter will be a revelation to those who know the song via MOR covers by Vikki Carr, Helen Reddy, Andy Williams and others. Sands could sing with both delicacy and power at the same time, expressing the deep pain of a heart about to be broken. Her wheelhouse, though, is mid-tempo power-soul such as a powerful cover of "I'll Hold Out My Hand" that easily bests The Clique's overwrought interpretation, and gives the Box Tops (with Memphis soul icon Alex Chilton on lead vocal) a run for their money. There are numerous tracks here that should have been singles, and a handful that should have become soul icons in the company of Dusty, Aretha and the rest. With Rev-Ola's reissue (including the bonus track "Maybe Tomorrow"), at least these songs can be icons in your own collection.
https://wn.com/Evie_Sands_It's_This_I_Am
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